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💬General Category => General Discussion => Topic started by: dhouston on February 13, 2019, 01:44:41 PM

Title: GPS issue
Post by: dhouston on February 13, 2019, 01:44:41 PM
https://www.pcmag.com/news/366521/your-gps-devices-may-stop-working-on-april-6 (https://www.pcmag.com/news/366521/your-gps-devices-may-stop-working-on-april-6)
Title: Re: GPS issue
Post by: beelocks on February 13, 2019, 07:57:05 PM
But then again, if you have a GPS made before 2010 the maps are probably out of date and the manufacturer has stopped supporting it. This is likely why I had an email from TomTom telling me that my older device can no longer be updated and would I please click here for a 20% discount off a shiny new device.

All things considered, $150-$200 is a small price to pay for not fighting paper maps. Especially when you consider that the first GPS I bought cost me well over 1000 and didn't have on-board route planning   :o
Title: Re: GPS issue
Post by: HA Dave on February 14, 2019, 01:04:13 AM
But then again, if you have a GPS made before 2010 the maps are probably out of date.....

I loved my 1st old GPS device. That was a giant leap forward in navigation technology. But nothing lasts forever. Now-a-days... I just use my phone. I even have an app... that tracks every bicycle ride I take and keeps a detailed log. AND... I can still use the phone while it's running/logging.
Title: Re: GPS issue
Post by: brobin on February 14, 2019, 12:15:53 PM
It'll be interesting to see what happens, if anything.  I have a 2008 Jeep Commander at my other place (with only 18,000 mi!) with built in nav that's never been updated but works fine for where it's used. Not a big deal if it doesn't since I usually use my phone anyway.
Title: Re: GPS issue
Post by: HA Dave on February 14, 2019, 02:54:04 PM
It'll be interesting to see what happens, if anything.  I have a 2008 Jeep Commander...... with built in nav

I worked with a guy years ago.... who had a factory installed car phone that was no longer serviceable. Some of us "keep" our cars and others see them more as consumables. My Ford connects (BT) to my phone.... but I am sure even that will only last 2 or 3 phone generations. In the past.... young drivers would have a new audio system installed in cars to replace the factory (inferior) audio. AND.... in the 1950's... my Dad bought a new car, but chose to NOT get the factory AC. And instead drove to Sears and had a cheaper and yet better AC unit bolted in.

But even our mobile phones are only expected to last so long. As we get older... a decade doesn't seem like such a long time. But for high tech.... 10 years is forever.
Title: Re: GPS issue
Post by: JeffVolp on February 14, 2019, 07:59:07 PM
Some of us "keep" our cars and others see them more as consumables.

I recently upgraded my 1995 Explorer "hiking car" to a 2005.  It has lots of new features, such as a CD player.  (My daily driver is a '79 280ZX.)

After reading this I am concerned about my Magellan 210 GPS.  It is pretty old now, but it has many routes stored in it that I use to lead hikes into the back country.  I do have a newer GPS, but its color screen is almost impossible to see in the bright sun we usually have out here.

Jeff
 
Title: Re: GPS issue
Post by: bkenobi on February 15, 2019, 10:19:45 AM
A phone and a GPS are not the same thing.  If you need to know where the nearest coffee shop is, your phone is probably a better choice.  Anything outside of "the grid" would be better served with a real GPS.  I've tried to use a phone when hunting in BFE and guess what...no data therefore no GPS.  Don't be fooled by people who have no clue.  Some technology is still needed even when it's more than 6 months old.
Title: Re: GPS issue
Post by: beelocks on February 15, 2019, 11:41:01 PM
Anything outside of "the grid" would be better served with a real GPS.

Not necessarily as there are GPS apps that do work without an internet connection.
My biggest issue with using a phone as a GPS is that every single time you're approaching a turn in an area you're not familiar with the phone will ring, blank the screen and force you to miss your turn thereby initiating an 18 minute detour because you headed north instead of south.

Yup, a dedicated GPS for me every time thanks.
Title: Re: GPS issue
Post by: HA Dave on February 16, 2019, 07:32:36 AM
. I've tried to use a phone when hunting in BFE and guess what...no data therefore no GPS.

Egypt is on my bucket list.... but I only thought about sight seeing... no idea what to hunt there.

I'd think reliable old weather-proofed paper map, a compass, and maybe a click-counter cord... might be handy. As well as the ability to determine scat.... from deer poop. But not being a hunter or wilderness hiker... I wouldn't make any recommendations to/for either.

What sold me on the phones pretend GPS (I am an apple phone user). Was a few years ago.... I was called and asked to pick-up a child and drive her to her sitters home. I knew where the school was at... but had no idea of where the sitter lived. I was texted the address and off I went. While in route I was directed by my iphones app to change course... which I did. The APP routed me around a huge accident that had just happened. This was a perfect example of the benefits of the cloud usage. 
Title: Re: GPS issue
Post by: dave w on February 16, 2019, 10:09:00 AM
I have a 2008 Jeep Commander at my other place (with only 18,000 mi!) with built in nav that's never been updated
Is that the "UConnect" version? Jeep wanted $150 to update our GPS info, which I thought was pretty ridiculous.   
Title: Re: GPS issue
Post by: brobin on February 16, 2019, 06:53:39 PM
Yes, UConnect. For $150 you can buy a nee GPS which is why I never updated it. Hasn't been problem though.
Title: Re: GPS issue
Post by: bkenobi on February 17, 2019, 01:01:24 AM
My truck has a Uconnect head unit that includes the GPS hardware.  They offered my a discount from the normal price of only $500 to turn it on.  If I ever want to update the maps, it will only cost me another $150 (as you both have learned).  I currently use my phone for GPS, but I have found more than one location where if I don't have navigation going prior to that spot, I'm SOL.  I have a TomTom but it's old and doesn't include map updates either.

But, real GPS devices have their place.  I use GPS dog collars and would not trust something phone based.  Garmin makes an excellent product.  If the safety of your dog/child/spouse/etc are at stake, it's best to have quality products and a phone doesn't do it for GPS needs in my experience.  They do a great job of finding a path to the library down town though!
Title: Re: GPS issue
Post by: JeffVolp on February 17, 2019, 09:31:30 AM
Here is some info regarding an actual GPS versus an "app" running on a smart phone.  Yesterday we were hiking in the Valley Of Fire north of Vegas.  I always had the topo map displayed on my GPS, but the smart phone one person in our group was using only showed the track.  On the drive home as people were comparing tracks the map popped up on his phone as we neared a town.  So the map for his smart phone app relies on the telecommunication network versus being stored directly in the GPS memory.

Jeff
Title: Re: GPS issue
Post by: bkenobi on February 17, 2019, 10:48:19 AM
Right, that's what I meant about dead spots.  When the data isn't available the phone can't download maps. If you plan ahead it is possible to do offline maps with Google at least.
Title: Re: GPS issue
Post by: brobin on February 17, 2019, 01:21:48 PM
Google Maps offers the ability to download and store map segments just for that purpose. When travelling internationally where data connections may be scarce or very expensive, I'll download segments in advance to use with GPS with WiFi turned off. This was very helpful while walking around Havana recently looking for places like the Havana Club Rum Museum!
Title: Re: GPS issue
Post by: HA Dave on February 17, 2019, 10:56:50 PM
but the smart phone one person in our group was using only showed the track.  On the drive home as people were comparing tracks the map popped up on his phone as we neared a town.  So the map for his smart phone app relies on the telecommunication network versus being stored directly in the GPS memory.
Jeff

Apple phones [iphones] don't use GPS (directly) They use data from the cell towers. I would NOT recommend a cell phone for a rural hike. And... I'd always include an actual old fashion map and compose. Like the preppers say: 2 is 1, and 1 is none.
Title: Re: GPS issue
Post by: bkenobi on February 18, 2019, 12:07:39 AM
Android devices use a combination of GPS and cell towers.  But if you don't plan ahead and have the maps it doesn't matter what location method is available.  Also, my phone lasts around 4 hours when navigating via GPS (screen on) while the GPS tends to last longer.  Yes, both can be plugged into the car while driving.  My dog collar receiver works for around a day of hunting but that's primarily dependent on how the collar communications is set up.  Without the collar turned on, it would last for several days I imagine.