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Author Topic: XPFM for a fan  (Read 51825 times)

steven r

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XPFM for a fan
« on: July 20, 2007, 12:45:32 PM »

I just got my XPFM installed with a little help from Mr Sparky. I called them in because I expected that the install would need to be in the attic. As it turns out we figured out an easier way to wire it inline that I might of been able to do myself.

Now for my challenge...
At every fan speed other than the highest speed when I send the XPFM an off signal it will immediately click back on. At the highest fan speed everything is ok. Is this normal or do I have a defective XPFM.
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dave w

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2007, 02:16:18 PM »

Does your fan have lights? If so, turn on the lights, does XPFM still turn back on?
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steven r

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2007, 01:22:20 AM »

I checked and the lights don't have an effect. My lights and fan are wired independently.
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Oldtimer

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2007, 08:19:56 AM »

I checked and the lights don't have an effect. My lights and fan are wired independently.

Could you tell us more about the speed control or, better yet, give us a make/model number so we could look the manual for it up up on the web?
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steven r

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2007, 12:12:00 PM »

Could you tell us more about the speed control or, better yet, give us a make/model number so we could look the manual for it up up on the web?
I wish I did know the model. A manual would be helpful. As this is a high ceiling, I would need a latter to reach it that I don't have. It's a standard "builders grade" fan that came with the house, less than 5 years old. The fan has your standard pull switch.
i.e. fast/med/slow/off

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Oldtimer

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2007, 12:37:52 PM »

It's a standard "builders grade" fan that came with the house, less than 5 years old. The fan has your standard pull switch.
i.e. fast/med/slow/off

My guess is that one of these would apply:

Generic Ceiling Fan Wiring Diagrams

I'm not sure what's going on here but I suspect back EMF from the fan motor in reduced speed mode may be triggering the XPFM module back on.  Maybe someone else on the forum can chime in on this discussion.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2007, 12:43:20 PM by Oldtimer »
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Boiler

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2007, 01:46:11 PM »

I wish I did know the model. A manual would be helpful. As this is a high ceiling, I would need a latter to reach it that I don't have. It's a standard "builders grade" fan that came with the house, less than 5 years old. The fan has your standard pull switch.
i.e. fast/med/slow/off

So power is supplied to the XPFM through a standard wall switch?

Any chance you have a "shaky" neutral connection to the XPFM (picking up noise on the neutral)?

Short of that, OldTimer's theory of back EMF is the only other effect I can think of.  Without knowing how your fan speed is controlled (capacitor, tapped motor windings) it's hard to say what the phasing/amplitude of the back EMF is doing at low speed.

OldTimer - nice fan diagrams.  I'm having problems figuring out the first diagram though.  Seems like the speed control table doesn't match the diagram.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2007, 04:19:42 PM by Boiler »
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steven r

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2007, 04:23:49 PM »

...So power is supplied to the XPFM through a standard wall switch?...
The fan and the light were originally both controlled by separate wall switches. The XPFM replaced the fan's wall switch. In addition the light & fan have pull switches on the unit themselves.

...Any chance you have a "shaky" neutral connection to the XPFM (picking up noise on the neutral)?...
If it did, wouldn't it be more likely to shake at the higher speed? Remember it's on the slower speeds that the switch turns back on.

It's looking like I'm going to need a ladder to see if I can figure out what to model number is. Fortunately the identical bedroom fan will be easier to reach.
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Boiler

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2007, 05:31:04 PM »

...Any chance you have a "shaky" neutral connection to the XPFM (picking up noise on the neutral)?...
If it did, wouldn't it be more likely to shake at the higher speed? Remember it's on the slower speeds that the switch turns back on.
Actually, I was trying to ask if you might have a poor neutral connection (high resistance) which could cause the XPFM problems.  Sorry for the poor use of the word "shaky".

Since you brought up the fan speed - an unbalanced fan at low speed will exhibit a lot of displacement (motion).  As the speed goes up, the frequency of oscillation will increase and the actual displacement will go down. 

It would be a real reach to imply the your fan movement was pulling on the wires and causing a problem with the electrical connections.  If I were to imply that your electrician would probably be justified in paying me a visit to explain things in detail.
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steven r

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2007, 10:45:22 PM »

Fortunately the fan in my bed room is identical and I was able to view it's label by standing on my bed. So far the numbers haven't helped me google a manual but I'd loved to be proven wrong on it not being on the web.

The numbers I found on the label are "HC1131", "82H4" and "EB1964". It's a 52 inch fan and it says it's .75 A at 120V.
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Oldtimer

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2007, 10:47:33 PM »


OldTimer - nice fan diagrams.  I'm having problems figuring out the first diagram though.  Seems like the speed control table doesn't match the diagram.


Boiler: The diagrams are off the Web as a result of a Google search.  Not my work.  I looked at the first one again and can see why you questioned it.  In my opinion it is OK.  The speed control seems to be coming from an unspecified capacitor with two elements in it, probably a larger and smaller.  In that case the switching table would appear to be logical.
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Oldtimer

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2007, 10:58:57 PM »


The numbers I found on the label are "HC1131", "82H4" and "EB1964". It's a 52 inch fan and it says it's .75 A at 120V.


I hate to send you up on the bed again but is there any chance that there is a UPC (bar code) label on the fan?  If so give us all the numbers under the bar code.  Usually a single leading digit, then two groups of multiple digits and a single trailing digit.

I Googled your numbers and didn't get anything either. Very frustrating!

Thanks
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Boiler

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #12 on: July 21, 2007, 11:53:42 PM »

The numbers I found on the label are "HC1131", "82H4" and "EB1964". It's a 52 inch fan and it says it's .75 A at 120V.

The only reliable hit I get is for a Craftmade 52" fan with a "EB" in the model number.  Nothing on manuals or motor configuration.
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steven r

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #13 on: July 22, 2007, 12:20:34 AM »

Here's the label. Hope it's not too big. About all I can do from this computer is crop. Sorry if it's a bit blurred. It is a close up shot while standing on the rail on the foot of my bed. Sorry no bar codes.

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Boiler

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #14 on: July 22, 2007, 02:08:59 PM »

« Last Edit: July 22, 2007, 02:12:22 PM by Boiler »
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