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Author Topic: XPFM for a fan  (Read 51700 times)

KDR

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #30 on: July 24, 2007, 05:41:25 PM »

KDR,
Why did SHRINKING the GIFs make them grainy? I would have thought smaller would be sharper, as with viewing Basic (lowest bitrate) TiVo/ReplayTV files on a 21" TV vs a 60" TV. ???

An over simplified way to think about it is...
If you have an image with a resolution of 72 ppi (pixels per inch) and the image is 4 inches wide you have a total of 288 pixels in the width of the image. If you reduce the width by 50% the image is now 2 inches wide. Two inches at 72 ppi now totals to 144 pixels for the total width of the image. Reduce it another 25% making it 1 inch wide and you have 72 pixels for total width. When you do this it becomes grainy. To get around some of the grain, the image can be saved with a program that can save the image using the "Bi-cubic" method. The bi-cubic method is just one way of controlling the image gradient color range. (Keep in mind that PPI displayed on a monitor vs printing outputs a bit different)

If you convert the image into a "jpg" then shrink it, it would come out a bit better. A good rule to follow for image format is as follows.
GIF - used for sharp line art type images with solid colors. (GIF format uses a max of 256 colors) Non Anti-aliased images. Images with animation or transparent backgrounds.
JPG - used for images with continues color up to 16M. Photographic type images, anti-aliased images.

There are a ton more reasons for using either or and for using other formats as well.

----------------KDR
« Last Edit: July 25, 2007, 05:37:00 AM by KDR »
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waterstom

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #31 on: September 22, 2007, 04:43:13 PM »

Steven R -
There are 2 models of the inline unit, XPFM and XPDF.  Only XPFM provides local control natively.  The other model allows you to wire a local switch inline to ADD local control.  That one also allows dimming, where I believe your's doesn't.  The piece of printed scrap paper (instructions) that was in the package goes into short deatail about it.  Your situation is frustrating becasue you actually don't need the features of the XPFM you need the XPDF with abiltiy to handle inductive loads.

As far as why it functions fine in HIGH but turns itself back on in Med and Lo, my thoughts are this...
Local Control functions by sensing load.  When your fan is in Med or Lo speeds, there is inductive resistance placed on the line to slow the fan down.  So, if you turn the fan off with X10, that command goes thru, the fan turns off, and then the resistance is what triggers the fan back on.  In High, that is not present, so the fan goes on and off like you want it to.

The inline units are great tho... after I've put my 1st one in, I am going to do many more.  Even gonna wire one into my cabinet-mounted microwave to control the lights there.  Other cool ideas pending.
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Boiler

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #32 on: September 22, 2007, 08:44:27 PM »

There are 2 models of the inline unit, XPFM and XPDF.  Only XPFM provides local control natively.  The other model allows you to wire a local switch inline to ADD local control.  That one also allows dimming, where I believe your's doesn't.  The piece of printed scrap paper (instructions) that was in the package goes into short deatail about it.  Your situation is frustrating becasue you actually don't need the features of the XPFM you need the XPDF with abiltiy to handle inductive loads.

waterstom,

I think you've swapped your unit designations.

The XPDF is specified for resistive loads only and has warnings regarding it's use with motor, low voltage, or fluorescent loads.

X10 pro link : XPDF

The XPFM is claimed to be designed for 15A inductive or appliance loads.

X10 pro link : XPFM

The XPDF specification does mention local control.  The XPFM does not.

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cksedg

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #33 on: January 17, 2008, 12:39:01 PM »

I am having the exact same problem with an in-line XPFM.  I have installed it on a new fan, with no wall switch at all---just the XPFM, mounted inside the  canopy of the fan.  With the fan pull chain on high speed, it works perfectly.  Also with the pull chain to the "off" position, it works (you can hear it clicking off).  With the pull chain in the "low" or "medium" position, you hear the XPFM clicking off and immediately back on.  EVERY TIME!  It will not turn off.  Can anyone help more?
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cksedg

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #34 on: January 17, 2008, 01:30:40 PM »

Ok---after reading everything I can find about the XPFM, I am convinced my problem from the previous posting is from local control.  I have disabled local control on a regular plug-in appliance module by "snipping" the wire from position #7 (found several diagrams out there on the internet); but I have not done it on an XPFM.  Has anyone out there done it, and is it essentially the same as the plug-in module?

Any help---with a diagram or actual picture---would be appreciated.

Thanks,
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jmanley

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #35 on: September 10, 2010, 05:53:20 PM »

I hate to resurrect a "dead" topic... but I'm having this exact same problem with my newly installed XPFM.  Does anybody have a solution? I'm willing to disable the local control, but I need a diagram to show me what jumper to clip.

Any help would be appreciated....Thanks
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Brandt

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #36 on: September 10, 2010, 05:57:39 PM »

What is the date code on your XPFM
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jmanley

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #37 on: September 10, 2010, 06:04:52 PM »

What is the date code on your XPFM

If that's the white sticker on the back... 10E19 (I think it's a 1... the first number is a bit smudged off).

FYI - I tried the resistor solution offered in this thread and the fan won't even turn on with the resistors coming off the blue (switched) lead from the XPFM.

Also.... if I hold the blades, it will turn off without turning on and if I hold the off button on my 3 button stick on wall switch eventually it turns off (sometimes) after turning back on several times.

I think it's definitely EMF back feed from the motor.
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Brian H

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #38 on: September 10, 2010, 06:15:57 PM »

How did you connect the resistor?
If you connected the resistor between the Blue wire from the XPFM and the fans line wire. That was incorrect.
Connect the Blue wire to the fans line connection as you normally would. The resistor has to go from the XPFMs White to XPFMs Blue wire.
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jmanley

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #39 on: September 10, 2010, 06:19:09 PM »

How did you connect the resistor?
If you connected the resistor between the Blue wire from the XPFM and the fans line wire. That was incorrect.
Connect the Blue wire to the fans line connection as you normally would. The resistor has to go from the XPFMs White to XPFMs Blue wire.

Brian, Thanks for the quick replies... please forgive me, but you confused me when you said that the resistor has to go from the XPFM's White to XPFM's Blue.  Those two wires aren't connected.  The white will go to the neutral line in the house.  I can put the resistor on the white wire, but I want to make sure that I'm not misunderstanding you... The white and blue shouldn't be touching... correct?

Update: I put the resistor on the white line from the XPFM and then I lost the ability to turn the fan off at all (press the off button and no click at all - not even click off and click back on like before). I think that disabling local control is really the best option for this setup... I just don't know how :(
« Last Edit: September 10, 2010, 06:29:45 PM by jmanley »
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Brian H

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #40 on: September 10, 2010, 06:36:49 PM »

----BLUE -------*------Fan
                       | Resistor between the Blue and White. Blue and White not connected to each other.
                       |
-----White -----*------Neutral

One end of resistor to the splice of the Blue wire and the fans line wire.
Other end of resistor to the splice of the White neutral connection.

If like this it will not work  Blue----------------*-resistor-*----- fan line connection.
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jmanley

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #41 on: September 10, 2010, 06:53:08 PM »

----BLUE -------*------Fan
                       | Resistor between the Blue and White. Blue and White not connected to each other.
                       |
-----White -----*------Neutral

One end of resistor to the splice of the Blue wire and the fans line wire.
Other end of resistor to the splice of the White neutral connection.

If like this it will not work  Blue----------------*-resistor-*----- fan line connection.

Brian, my friend, I owe you a beer!  and when my girlfriend realizes that darned fan can actually turn off... she will sing your praises from the highest mountains.
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Brian H

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #42 on: September 10, 2010, 06:54:49 PM »

Hope it works. Most times it does, but you know Murphy and his law.  ;D
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jmanley

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #43 on: September 10, 2010, 07:02:08 PM »

Hope it works. Most times it does, but you know Murphy and his law.  ;D

oh... it works like a charm... and I unlike the site mentioned earlier in this thread, I was able to make it work with 1 47k 1/2 watt resistor... not 2. (They were correct, Radio Shack doesn't carry the 22k 1 watt resistors).

This shouldn't produce enough heat to prevent me from mounting this in the switch box in the wall... correct?
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Brian H

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Re: XPFM for a fan
« Reply #44 on: September 10, 2010, 07:08:56 PM »

47K with 120 volts is about .306 watts.
I don't think it will get too hot.
Just have some insulation on the resistor lead to insulate them. Not wanting them to touch anything and spark.  ;D
« Last Edit: September 10, 2010, 07:14:17 PM by Brian H »
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