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Author Topic: Ubuntu Linux  (Read 86313 times)

Charles Sullivan

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Re: Ubuntu Linux
« Reply #15 on: August 17, 2009, 02:22:44 PM »

I just picked up an ActiveHome Pro module CM15A.  Is there something for Ubuntu that would allow me to run this unit in Linux Land?

Misterhouse  (http://sourceforge.net/projects/misterhouse/) has some basic support for the CM15A.

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Yesterday it worked.
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X10 on Windows is like that.

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Deemar

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Re: Ubuntu Linux
« Reply #16 on: August 17, 2009, 02:32:37 PM »

I just picked up an ActiveHome Pro module CM15A.  Is there something for Ubuntu that would allow me to run this unit in Linux Land?
no

And that is sad too. Not that I am a big fan of Linux.... to be honest I am really NOT. But I am a big fan of home automation and I feel it should be available to [nearly] everyone. One of the really great things about X10 itself... is that it is value priced (cheap to buy) yet solid reliable.

Although the CM15A is the state-of-the-art HA interface of the day.... the same thing could have been said a few years ago. As a matter of fact... the state-of-the-art computers that were available when the CM15A was released... are dust collectors today. I use an old P3 that I saved from curbside on trash day... and I even use BVC with Speech Recognition... to voice command my Home Automation.

Sure this techno-recycling won't make us popular with our Euro friends determined to bring down the evil American software giant... but what the heck... it makes for good HA.
I just use a CM11A and a CM17A on the same port. I haven't looked at all the features of the CM15A but I can probably do just about anything that can do with my setup. I have wired and wireless, what else is there?
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HA Dave

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Re: Ubuntu Linux
« Reply #17 on: August 17, 2009, 03:48:07 PM »

I just use a CM11A and a CM17A on the same port. I haven't looked at all the features of the CM15A but I can probably do just about anything that can do with my setup. I have wired and wireless, what else is there?

That's brillant Deemar!

I own both a CM11A and an old serial firecracker (CM17A). I have had both for a few years... and they hang around in my parts box. But where does today's Linux user find these devices? Are they hard to come by (like ebay only.. finds)?
« Last Edit: August 17, 2009, 03:50:25 PM by Dave_x10_L »
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Charles Sullivan

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Re: Ubuntu Linux
« Reply #18 on: August 17, 2009, 05:20:58 PM »

I just use a CM11A and a CM17A on the same port. I haven't looked at all the features of the CM15A but I can probably do just about anything that can do with my setup. I have wired and wireless, what else is there?

Heyu (http://www.heyu.org) supports an RF receiver like MR26A, W800RF32A, or RFXCOM for an auxiliary input.

The MR26A receives only standard X10 RF and some older X10 entertainment RF, e.g., from a UR81A remote.  Its range is not that great.

The W800RF32A (http://www.wgldesigns.com) receives, in addition to the above, signals from X10 Security sensors.

The RFXCOM 310 MHz (http://www.rfxcom.com) receives all the above plus signals from RFXSensor Temperature/Humidity/Barometric pressure sensors.
The RFXCOM 433.92 MHz (or the dual frequency 310/433.92 MHz model) receives signals from European X10 sensors and also signals from  RFXMeter electric/water/gas sensors and Oregon Scientific sensors, e.g., Temperature/Humidity/Barometric pressure/Anemometer/Rain gauge/UV sensor/Bathroom scale/Remote meat thermometer. 

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Charles Sullivan

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Re: Ubuntu Linux
« Reply #19 on: August 17, 2009, 05:46:02 PM »

I just use a CM11A and a CM17A on the same port. I haven't looked at all the features of the CM15A but I can probably do just about anything that can do with my setup. I have wired and wireless, what else is there?

That's brillant Deemar!

I own both a CM11A and an old serial firecracker (CM17A). I have had both for a few years... and they hang around in my parts box. But where does today's Linux user find these devices? Are they hard to come by (like ebay only.. finds)?

Dave:
The CM11A is out of production but still available on dealer shelves, primarily at authorized X10 resellers on eBay.  X-10 is still advertising the CK18A kit which includes a CM17A, but you can generally find the kit or the CM17A by itself from the above dealers.

And then there are individuals who have these "antiques" hanging around in their parts box and who will likely be selling them on eBay.  :-)

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Yesterday it worked.
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X10 on Windows is like that.

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HA Dave

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Re: Ubuntu Linux
« Reply #20 on: August 17, 2009, 06:36:05 PM »

.... And then there are individuals who have these "antiques" hanging around in their parts box and who will likely be selling them on eBay.  :-)

I certainly didn't mean to refer to these devices as "antiques". After all... they were new when I bought them. I guess I tend to think about tomorrow... more than today. I keep spares in my parts box... not just older items. I even keep a spare CM15A... as well as a backup Home Automation Computer.
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jukingeo

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Re: Ubuntu Linux
« Reply #21 on: August 20, 2009, 10:31:50 PM »


And that is sad too. Not that I am a big fan of Linux.... to be honest I am really NOT. But I am a big fan of home automation and I feel it should be available to [nearly] everyone. One of the really great things about X10 itself... is that it is value priced (cheap to buy) yet solid reliable.

I am actually a fan of Linux, but it is kind of what I would say a "held back" OS.  What I mean by that is lack of support for much of the hardware devices out there.  Granted most of the hardware driver issues are the fault of the companies that make the hardware, they don't want to bother with creating drivers for a 'free' OS.  However, if you ask me they are closing themselves off from many potential buyers.   While the OS is free, the hardware isn't and they could make money off of the Linux OS fans as well as the PC & Mac fans.

As for X10, I started using it when it was available at Radio Shack under the name Plug N Power.   I was fascinated  at how it operated.  I started with a simple wall lamp module and a lamp module for a table lamp in the living room.   I had a desktop clock/timer control it all.   Then I expanded that system to wireless remotes and control of appliances.  The Active Home Pro is just the latest advancement forward.  The AHP will replace a wireless transmitter and the old clock/timer.  Also, new is the use of Infrared Motion Sensors (i.e. to control a light over a stairway).

The next step forward for me with X10 is the security system.

I will say that now being more than a novice user of X10, I have seen that the system DOES malfunction every now and then, but for the most part it is pretty reliable.  Thus far I only have had one defective item.

Quote
Although the CM15A is the state-of-the-art HA interface of the day.... the same thing could have been said a few years ago. As a matter of fact... the state-of-the-art computers that were available when the CM15A was released... are dust collectors today. I use an old P3 that I saved from curbside on trash day... and I even use BVC with Speech Recognition... to voice command my Home Automation.

I have quite a few Windows 98 machines that were retired from my job and I am starting to convert them as 'special use PC's.  One I am using for a commerical video game (Hyperbowl), another is for jukebox use, still yet another is for Mame.

Quote
Sure this techno-recycling won't make us popular with our Euro friends determined to bring down the evil American software giant... but what the heck... it makes for good HA.

I still use Windows 98 and XP and for the most part I do like Microsoft's products.  But it is a company that is starting to get to big for it's britches and the newer OS's (Vista) are just getting so bloated it practically forces you into buying a whole new machine.   I realized that many of the features of these bloated programs and OS's I don't even bother using.  Furthermore, I don't like the fact that you NEED to have an internet connection with many of the newer program's (or OS's) security features in order to run the program.  What if a software company goes under and you have to reinstall the program...you would be screwed out of using the program.  It makes me feel that I am not buying a program, but rather 'renting it' and it is only as good as the company is willing to support it.  It this latter most point in which I decided to make the switch to Linux.  With Linux I have more of a choice with what I want to put on my system.  Furthermore I can test the FULL version of the program without dealing with 'crippled' demo versions on a pay OS system.

For the most part Ubuntu does have equivalent programs that compare to their Windows OS counterpart.  There is Open Office, which does essentially substitute for Microsoft Office.  There is Evolution, which replaces Outlook, and there is Firefox for the web browser.  I mostly use Firefox even in Windows.  In fact right now as I am typing this I am using Firefox via Ubuntu.

For the general everyday tasks Ubuntu shines just as bright as Windows.  But as I said, the shortcomings are in the hardware support and of course newer games are an issue and certain specific applications where I still need Windows for.   I would say as of now I am running Ubuntu 80% of the time.  However, I am always looking to bump that percentage up, which is the reason I asked about the support for the AHP via Ubuntu.

From what I am finding out though, with Linux, the older the hardware, the better.  Linux always seems to be trailing behind the PC and the Mac...which is why it does make a good OS for older computers or specific tasks (provided you can get your piece of hardware to work).

Anyway, that is my take on Linux.  I like it, but it isn't where it should be due to the lack of hardware support.  Out of all I/O connections via Linux I find USB compatibility to be the worst.  AND just about everything is USB now.

Geo
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HA Dave

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Re: Ubuntu Linux
« Reply #22 on: August 21, 2009, 12:42:38 AM »

... I will say that now being more than a novice user of X10, I have seen that the system DOES malfunction every now and then, but for the most part it is pretty reliable.  Thus far I only have had one defective item.

The more reliable the automation... the greater the fun. There are a few threads here about "how reliable is your setup". 100% reliable anything.. may be.... 100% impossible. "Every now and then" might be a good description. But X10 can be made pretty darn dependable... with a little effort.

I have bought a couple defective items. But at the tiny per unit price I pay for X10 stuff (and the number of items I've bought)... I guess I overlooked that.

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Brian H

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Re: Ubuntu Linux
« Reply #23 on: August 21, 2009, 06:22:02 AM »

I have been trying out Ubuntu 9.04 and so far I like it. Has a issue with my local computers clock, but I am sure I can find the answer in their forums.
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jukingeo

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Re: Ubuntu Linux
« Reply #24 on: August 22, 2009, 11:04:49 PM »


The more reliable the automation... the greater the fun. There are a few threads here about "how reliable is your setup". 100% reliable anything.. may be.... 100% impossible. "Every now and then" might be a good description. But X10 can be made pretty darn dependable... with a little effort.

I have bought a couple defective items. But at the tiny per unit price I pay for X10 stuff (and the number of items I've bought)... I guess I overlooked that.



Well, I would like to say I want to shoot for as close to 100% as possible (even though that might be impossible).  It is pretty much minor things, but it is random.  For instance one night one of my lamps turned on at about 6:00am and I turned it off.  About 1 minute later it came back on again.  I turned it off and then it was OK.

I have the staircase light programmed to come on with a motion sensor, stay on for 90 seconds and then turn off.  Last night I it triggered on, but STAYED on.  I had to turn it off manually.

So far it is little quirks like that I am dealing with.   While most think that this may be trivial, they would be right, BUT I am thinking about expanding X-10 into their home security systems and THAT is something I don't need little 'ghost' problems with.  So my thinking is that my 'minor' problems now could become major ones when I go into the security aspect of the game.  So finding out what is causing these 'ghosts' would be helpful.

As for product reliability and frequency of defects...well, lets just say that I only have had two problems with an X-10 product.  The first problem was a flourescent lamp switch module which SUPPOSED to fit in a standard electrical box.  Turned out it didn't fit. Upon discovering that, I installed the module IN the lamp housing.  It ran fine for 3 weeks and then burned out.  I requested a return RA from X-10 (twice) and they never emailed me with it...so I said "eff it"  I still have the bad module sitting on my table in the living room.

The second instance was the fault of my 2.5 year old son (of whom has button fever (he plays with anything that has buttons, in the case of a TV remote control or cell phone...he usually destroys it)).  He got a hold of the X10 house wireless transmitter module and was 'messing' with it.  After his 'playing with it', it hasn't behaved properly since.   It was then I bought the AHP CM15A.  It has NO buttons on it for my son to play with.

Geo
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jukingeo

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Re: Ubuntu Linux
« Reply #25 on: August 22, 2009, 11:06:20 PM »

I just picked up an ActiveHome Pro module CM15A.  Is there something for Ubuntu that would allow me to run this unit in Linux Land?

Misterhouse  (http://sourceforge.net/projects/misterhouse/) has some basic support for the CM15A.



Oh, Ok...missed this reply earlier.  Thanks for the tip-off, I will check it out.

Geo
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HA Dave

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Re: Ubuntu Linux
« Reply #26 on: August 22, 2009, 11:56:41 PM »

I have the staircase light programmed to come on with a motion sensor, stay on for 90 seconds and then turn off.  Last night I it triggered on, but STAYED on.  I had to turn it off manually.

So far it is little quirks like that I am dealing with.   While most think that this may be trivial....

Nothing trivial about that! That would fall into the major malfunction category as far as I am concerned. You should post each problem like that at a proper thread location. That isn't something that I would normally except with home automation.

« Last Edit: August 24, 2009, 06:53:50 AM by Dave_x10_L »
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luria

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Re: Ubuntu Linux
« Reply #27 on: January 11, 2010, 11:07:21 AM »



Anyway, that is my take on Linux.  I like it, but it isn't where it should be due to the lack of hardware support.  Out of all I/O connections via Linux I find USB compatibility to be the worst.  AND just about everything is USB now.

Geo
I find that linux has some very clear advantages over Windows, even when it comes to hardware:

1)  Open source drivers are usually better written and has more support from a large community than you get from two (or more) Taiwanese software engineers who cram code to make stuff work. A good example is the drivers for my DVB-S and S-2 satellite cards which consistently run better, has more options and is better maintained than the windows version

2) Linux drivers interact with the OS and programs in a consistent and logic manner, while it's windows counterparts often is restricted to propietary software.  The output and/or input from/to devices is usually available to the end user through standardized devices.

3) Linux drivers may be restarted or reloaded if they fail or stop for some reason, without the need to reboot the computer.  It's easy to monitor and restart both programs and drivers in linux without interfering with the rest of the running system.

By far I find linux clearly superior to windows when it comes to automating tasks, running htpc's and doing other common tasks. It's legacy from servers, industry applications and other specialized environments guarantee that you will find resources to do almost anything.  In addition, development is user driven, so no more 1 year + waiting for updates from manufacturers if something does not work or miss an requested feature. I usually find that if device support in linux is missing, the reason is often that the product is flawed or clearly performing worse than comparable produts.  In fact' I have never been forced to  abandon a device because of lack of linux support.

Thats my 2 kroner anyway ;)
 
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birdzeye

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Re: Ubuntu Linux
« Reply #28 on: April 06, 2010, 10:18:49 AM »

Hi everyone,
I just wanted to share some info on my new linux "project" with x10. It's actually working quite well, so far.
I had an old clunky P3 with a 40G HD that I wanted to do something with, so I installed Ubuntu and a cheap TV Tuner card, which I then connected to an x10 audio/video sender/receiver (aka VR46A).

The picture is actually better than on my WindowsXP computer, and I'm able to record and have more recording options to play around with. For instance, I can have continuous surveillance of 9 cameras 24/7 and only use about 2G of HD space in a 24 hour period. And the picture is OK. If I want to get a better picture I can fine tune the settings, although this requires more HD space. Since my HD is only 40G, this ability to adjust the recording properties is letting me do more with what I have than ever before! It's great! :) I couldn't do that with Windows XP.  :(

Now I just have to figure out how to be able to turn x10 modules on/off on this setup, and I'll be able to use this remotely over the internet. I'm thinking that maybe a firecracker would be easiest?  8)

P.S. it's interesting to note that the tvtuner card was advertised as compatible with windows xp but not linux, and I could not get it to work properly on xp, but have it working beautifully on linux!  rofl
« Last Edit: April 06, 2010, 10:28:37 AM by birdzeye »
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Charles Sullivan

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Re: Ubuntu Linux
« Reply #29 on: April 06, 2010, 10:27:19 AM »

Hi everyone,
I just wanted to share some info on my new linux "project" with x10. It's actually working quite well, so far.
I had an old clunky P3 with a 40G HD that I wanted to do something with, so I installed Ubuntu and a cheap TV Tuner card, which I then connected to an x10 audio/video sender/receiver (aka VR46A).

The picture is actually better than on my WindowsXP computer, and I'm able to record and have more recording options to play around with. For instance, I can have continuous surveillance of 9 cameras 24/7 and only use about 2G of HD space in a 24 hour period. And the picture is OK. If I want to get a better picture I can fine tune the settings, although this requires more HD space. Since my HD is only 40G, this ability to adjust the recording properties is letting me do more with what I have than ever before! It's great! :) I couldn't do that with Windows XP.  :(

Now I just have to figure out how to be able to turn x10 modules on/off on this setup, and I'll be able to use this remotely over the internet. I'm thinking that maybe a firecracker would be easiest?  8)

Take a look at Heyu - X10 Automation for Linux, Unix, and Mac OS X  http://www.heyu.org
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Yesterday it worked.
Today it doesn't work.
X10 on Windows is like that.

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