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Author Topic: Connection issue  (Read 784 times)

whstoneman

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Connection issue
« on: September 20, 2019, 08:44:10 AM »

Been using WM100 for a year now without issues.  Yesterday, I started having problems.   

Tried to reinstall unit and getting an error message......"5G Wifi network connected.  Please use 2.4G network for WM100 connection. 

I am using Comcast modem....any suggestions to make the switch? 
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SkipWX10

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Re: Connection issue
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2019, 06:01:44 PM »

The WM100 only will connect to a 2.4G network. If you have a dual band router you must specify which band (2.4G) to connect to. You need to disconnect from the 5G and connect to the 2.4G on your phone before beginning the setup of the WM100.
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toasterking

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Re: Connection issue
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2019, 11:12:58 PM »

The WM100 only will connect to a 2.4G network.
Wow, I didn't even realize this.  So this brand new product design from 2018 uses WiFi tech from 2006?  It should come with a warning sticker that says not to try to control your X10 devices while using a microwave oven.  I live at the end of a dead-end road and the 2.4 GHz band is nearly too congested to be usable.  I can't imagine how anyone makes this work at all in a more densely populated area like a condominium.
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Brian H

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Re: Connection issue
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2019, 06:26:35 AM »

If you look at the Specification Tab for the WM100. It says 802.11 b/gin 2.4Mhz only.  ::)
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dave w

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Re: Connection issue
« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2019, 10:08:31 AM »

It should come with a warning sticker that says not to try to control your X10 devices while using a microwave oven. 
Toast, if you can't use the WM100 when your microwave is running, you may have a leaky microwave. Also, most WiFi IoT is still 2.4gHz. (not defending the "willie". Authinx bombed out on that. Still waiting for an Alexa, Google, interface).
« Last Edit: September 22, 2019, 10:19:59 AM by dave w »
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toasterking

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Re: Connection issue
« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2019, 10:53:38 AM »

Toast, if you can't use the WM100 when your microwave is running, you may have a leaky microwave.
That was my attempt at humor to make a point, but I admit I opened myself up to criticism.  I've never personally experienced a full WiFi DoS from using a microwave oven, but I did have the opportunity to play with a WiFi spectrum analyzer at work that cost as much as my car.  It was amazing to see everything swamped by noise in nearly all channels as soon as someone started making popcorn.  I don't know if the microwave oven was leaky, but my rationalization was that components in the oven other than the generated microwaves themselves could be oscillating at the same frequency in order to generate them, and maybe I was picking that up.  We did have reports of occasional outages in another building that were traced back to microwave oven use.  Analog cordless phones operating at 2.4 GHz were pretty bad offenders too.
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toasterking

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Re: Connection issue
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2019, 10:59:10 AM »

Another point here about microwave ovens is that the reason that they were assigned a specific frequency is because they can and do cause interference, so they needed to be assigned a band to cause interference in that wouldn't interfere with anything else assigned at the time.  And if I'm not mistaken, the reason that no license (and associated fees) is needed to use this frequency is because no quality of service can be guaranteed; it's already assigned to "noise and garbage".  And people wonder why they have problems with WiFi.  But hey, at least it's cheaper!
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dave w

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Re: Connection issue
« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2019, 05:46:05 PM »

That was my attempt at humor to make a point, but I admit I opened myself up to criticism. 
Toast! I did not mean to be critical. But I believe most microwave ovens are 2.450 gHz which IS smack dab in the middle of 802.11 a/b/c/x/y/z/etc. But I have worked in many places with WiFi connected computers and phones and 2 microwave ovens humming, with no WiFi problems traced back to an operating oven. I have never used a spectrum analyzer that could get near WiFi frequencies but IF an oven is wiping out WiFi, I am afraid of it. Corneas are sensitive to the upper frequency stuff and can be damaged long before one feels any physical effects.  So I thought I would throw up a flag. Glad it was humor

As a side note to your spectrum analyzer costing more than a car. Back in the early '70s I used an HP spectrum analyzer that could "squeak" up to a gig. That baby was $68k. And now you can buy a 2GHz SA off Ebay for under 200 bucks. Ain't SMD's and digital technology great!

Glad it was humor. But if your kitchen light glows when you cook an egg, be worried.  rofl
« Last Edit: September 23, 2019, 05:49:54 PM by dave w »
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