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Author Topic: Modified XPFM units for ceiling fan control?  (Read 485 times)

Pele

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Modified XPFM units for ceiling fan control?
« on: May 21, 2020, 12:52:52 PM »

Looks like through searches that there is very little ability to control ceiling fan speeds with X10.
Has anyone ever dismantled an XPFM module and replaced the relay with a DPDT relay?

Concept is as follows:



Cons:
Requires custom work/soldering/knowledge of electronics.
Might not fit in ceiling fan enclosure.
Requires two X10 IDs and potentially macros to control speeds.

Pros:
Uses existing fan windings; less chance of buzzing noise.
Simple, easy to understand.
No unintended configurations; all combinations of units on/off accounted for.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2020, 03:55:38 PM by Pele »
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dave w

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Re: Modified XPFM units for deiling fan control?
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2020, 04:12:55 PM »

I don't have a XPFM to pop the top, but I believe it uses a pulsed solenoid, ratcheting a cam which opens and closes a set of contacts, similar to the Appliance Module. good idea though.

If you can find the space and are in DIY mode, try the "Dr Ed Cheung No Hum X10 Fan Control". At one point (like in the 90's ) Ed contemplated etching boards and kiting his control. He promised to let me know if he went through with the idea. All I got was crickets, but he was working at NASA at the time, and he should be retired by now. Maybe board enough to do a little side business

http://www.edcheung.com/automa/nohum.htm

FWIW the Smarthome/insteon fan control also uses reactors to control motor speed, like Cheung's, however the unit made a slight buzz on low on a Hunter, but quiet on a Harbor Breeze. so mileage may vary.

https://www.smarthome.com/fanlinc-insteon-2475f-ceiling-fan-and-light-controller-fixture-module-dual-band.html
« Last Edit: May 21, 2020, 04:17:55 PM by dave w »
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Pele

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Re: Modified XPFM units for ceiling fan control?
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2020, 05:32:07 PM »

If I could find the X10 78566 or 78570 receiver chips, that's where I was going with this.
I'm very much a hardware guy... Screwdrivers and soldering irons.
But if I have to try my hand at futzing with a PIC microcontroller, then I'll do it.

I was gonna reuse his diagrams for the AM486 appliance module and etch it using all SMT parts and a pair of "ice cube" style relays.
I want it tiny so that it'll fit in the J-box or preferably in the housing of the ceiling fan.

« Last Edit: May 21, 2020, 05:33:44 PM by Pele »
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Brian H

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Re: Modified XPFM units for ceiling fan control?
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2020, 06:24:10 PM »

Some information. You may find interesting. What you are mentioning sounds like the older models that we could find schematics for.

The Lamp Module {Soft Start ramp on and off} and Appliance Modules{CFL Friendly} where both redesigned. With a new Micro-Controller Sonix SN8P2501B. The power supplies where also around 3.3 Volts DC. Those I have not seen any schematics of. I did a few sketches of the power supply areas.

Dave is right on the XPFM has a pulsed coil On Off Ratchet switch in it. It also has the ratchet switch on or off sensor current on the output. That type switch is pulsed by an SCR and it is single around a 120 volt half wave DC pulse. In to the coil.

The appliance modules also have the pulsed ratchet switches and on off sensor. I have not seen a constant On or Off signal you can use.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2020, 07:11:44 PM by Brian H »
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Pele

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Re: Modified XPFM units for ceiling fan control?
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2020, 09:24:49 PM »

Darnit...

Now I've gotta go and design a power supply that'll convert 120 VAC down to 5 VDC @ a couple ma as small as possible, make a microcontroller detect zero crossings, AND have it read bits off the 120 VAC line at zero crossing.

I was hoping to NOT have to reinvent the wheel.
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Brian H

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Re: Modified XPFM units for ceiling fan control?
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2020, 06:21:38 AM »

If you are thinking of using the IC from the older appliance modules.
The power supply in them is controlled by a 1N4744 15V Zener. The Line input is the common DC connection.
They pulse a MCR100-B SCR to connect the solenoids coil that ratchets the On Off switch cam. From Line to Neutral. The coil is 56 Ohms from my measurements. The schematics I found on the web did not match what is in my older units. In the On/Off and Local Control sensing areas.

The newer CFL friendly model with the surface mounted controller. Has about a 4.5 volt supply. With a Zener I could not see a marking on. They still do pulse the same coil to ratchet the on of switches cam.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2020, 06:25:32 AM by Brian H »
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Brian H

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Re: Modified XPFM units for ceiling fan control?
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2020, 06:50:43 AM »

This is close to what I found in my older appliance modules.
The TNRG221K MOV maybe a 07D221K MOV. There is also another 07D221K across the MCR100-B.

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toasterking

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Re: Modified XPFM units for ceiling fan control?
« Reply #7 on: May 22, 2020, 12:30:04 PM »

Has anyone ever dismantled an XPFM module and replaced the relay with a DPDT relay?

I actually had a similar idea and built a fan controller based on two XPFM modules in 2010.  I encountered the same issue with the pulses intended to control a ratcheting relay not being directly compatible with a typical DPDT relay.  I ended up not even trying to modify the XPFM modules.  Instead, I put them in an enclosure with two DPDT relays and 2 capacitors.  It did not fit in the fan housing.  Instead, I built each one in an electrical box mounted in the attic directly above each fan.

I built 6 of these.  I've used them with several brands of ceiling fans, the speed levels are roughly the same on each, and none of them buzz.  I had minor concerns with the extreme temperatures in the attic, but in the course of 10 years, I've only had to replace one XPFM.  My macros do follow the manufacturer's intention of always starting the motor on HIGH speed.  (Starting on LOW would actually go OFF-HIGH-MED-LOW, i.e. B1 ON, B2 ON, B1 OFF.)

Attached is my wiring diagram.
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toasterking

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Re: Modified XPFM units for ceiling fan control?
« Reply #8 on: May 22, 2020, 12:34:43 PM »

Here is also my parts list and some very bad photos.

Parts list:
(2) DPDT 120VAC relays:
   PB904-ND at Digi-Key (Tyco PLCH-206A1S,000) rated to 131F
   275-217 at RadioShack no temperature rating
(2) X10 fixture modules, model XPFM rated to 140F
(2) 10 uF motor-run capacitors:
   EF2106-ND from Digi-Key (Panasonic ECQ-E2106KF)
(1) Electrical work box, 4" x 4" x 2.25"
(16) Female .187" quick-disconnects for 16AWG wire:
   85452 at Auto Zone (20 pack)
7 ft. 16AWG stranded primary wire, white
7 ft. 16AWG stranded primary wire, black
6 ft. 16AWG stranded primary wire, red
1 ft. 16AWG stranded primary wire, green
(4) Medium wire nuts
(2) Larger wire nuts

Create relay jumpers (each with a .187" female quick-disconnect on ONE end):
(1) 4 in. white
(1) 5 in. white
(1) 4 in. black
(1) 5 in. black
(6) 6.5 in. green
(1) 3 in. green

Cut jumpers on X10 XPFM module "A" to lengths:
Black: 4.5 in.
White: 5 in.
Blue: 5 in.
Crimp a .187" female quick-disconnect to the end of the blue wire.

Cut jumpers on X10 XPFM module "B" to lengths:
Black: 4.5 in.
White: 5 in.
Blue: 6 in.
Crimp a .187" female quick-disconnect to the end of the blue wire.

Follow the wiring diagram.  Each black dot in this case represents a wire nut.  Use the 2 large wire nuts for the white and black wires connecting to AC and the medium wire nuts for the others.  Every connection to a relay should use a .187" female quick-disconnect.
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toasterking

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Re: Modified XPFM units for ceiling fan control?
« Reply #9 on: May 22, 2020, 12:36:02 PM »

More photos...
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toasterking

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Re: Modified XPFM units for ceiling fan control?
« Reply #10 on: May 22, 2020, 12:36:42 PM »

More photos...
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toasterking

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Re: Modified XPFM units for ceiling fan control?
« Reply #11 on: May 22, 2020, 12:38:02 PM »

The enclosure could definitely be better.
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Brian H

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Re: Modified XPFM units for ceiling fan control?
« Reply #12 on: May 22, 2020, 04:06:17 PM »

toasterking
Thank you very much for the information on your custom use for X10 control.
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toasterking

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Re: Modified XPFM units for ceiling fan control?
« Reply #13 on: May 22, 2020, 08:46:32 PM »

@Brian H, I obviously thought it was important to document 10 years ago but I guess I never got around to sharing it!  Better late than never!
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toasterking

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Re: Modified XPFM units for ceiling fan control?
« Reply #14 on: May 22, 2020, 09:00:16 PM »

Also of note is there are/were X10 dual appliance micro modules on the UK market.  Attached is the manual for the 2268E/HE module, which used to be available from http://x10-hk.com but now appears to be discontinued.  Marmitek (now Haibrain) had a similar module.  One of these is about 1/3 to 1/2 the size of one XPFM module but has the capabilities of two XPFM modules.  These were not available when I built my fan controllers, but if you're set on trying to make everything fit inside the fan housing, this would get you a lot closer.  This model was intended for 220V AC but works fine on 110V AC except it does not recover the "ON" state of outputs after a power outage.  If you solder a 0.47F 250VDC polypropylene film capacitor in parallel across the existing 1.0F capacitor, it fixes that problem too.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2020, 09:02:34 PM by toasterking »
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