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Author Topic: Wall Switch with a mind of its own  (Read 65586 times)

Brian H

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Re: Wall Switch with a mind of its own
« Reply #15 on: July 29, 2005, 07:30:03 AM »

icepick; Be very carefull when doing the
modification. A soldering gun is really not
suted for soldering small IC pins and PC
Copper Runs. You can easily peel the run off
or overheat the IC. A small soldering iron
with a fine tip is a better choice. A static
proventive one is even better.
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icepick

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Re: Wall Switch with a mind of its own
« Reply #16 on: July 29, 2005, 12:10:00 PM »

I also have a Butane Soldering Pen with a
small tip.  Do you think that will be
suitable??  I have not opened the Wall
Switch yet, so I really don't know how small
everything is.  Guess I'll have to make a
judgement call when I see inside.
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Brian H

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Re: Wall Switch with a mind of its own
« Reply #17 on: July 29, 2005, 12:27:28 PM »

Small pc runs and parts. After you get one
apart. I am sure you can guage the iron to
use.
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david l

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Re: Wall Switch with a mind of its own
« Reply #18 on: July 29, 2005, 01:35:08 PM »

Icepick, since it sounds like you haven't
done any of this before, let me warn you
that everything in the module runs at 120
volt line potential and is referenced to
the "hot" line, not the neutral.  Don't do
anything with it plugged in or you may not
live to regret it.  And don't connect any
grounded test intruments or soldering iron
to the circuitry when it's plugged in;
you'll fry it beyond repair.
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icepick

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Re: Wall Switch with a mind of its own
« Reply #19 on: July 29, 2005, 02:04:40 PM »

I was not planning to work on the Wall
Switch while it was connected, but thanks
for the warning.  I have worked on circuit
boards, ECU's, and I/O Multiplex Modules
before, albeit 12v and 24v DC.  I am a Auto
Technician.  If worse comes to worse, I can
always give the wall switch to our I.T. Dept
to have the resister soldered.  They have a
very small soldering station with small
utensils, holding clips, and a 10" round
magnifying glass to make sure they see what
they are doing.  Like I said in the previous
post, I'll make a judgement call after I
open it.  Thanks again for the "Heads Up".
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Brian H

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Re: Wall Switch with a mind of its own
« Reply #20 on: July 29, 2005, 06:33:26 PM »

Sounds like you have it covered. Hope the
resistor helps. Many say it does. I believe
the floating IC pin is used in other
applications for an ON-OFF function.
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icepick

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Re: Wall Switch with a mind of its own
« Reply #21 on: July 30, 2005, 02:22:50 PM »

 
I did the modification outlined on the web
site: http://www.geocities.com/ido_bartana/.
Definitely dealing with very small parts.
One thing worth mentioning is that the
schematic at:
http://www.laureanno.com/WS467-2.PDF is a
bit different than the actual "as built"
switch, and pin numbers #3 through #9 as
listed on the schematic are in the wrong
sequence. Also, the schematic lists the
ground wire as yellow, mine is blue. Maybe
it had to do with the fact that my wall
switch is a Pro model# PLW01 (Ivory).  In
any case, pin#9 is directly accross pin#10.
I also found it easier to use a #74 (.0225")
drill bit to enlarge the #9 pin hole on the
circuit board.  Then I inserted the Resister
in the #9 pin hole and soldered it easily. I
decided to insulate the entire resister with
heat-shrink tubing so that there was no
possible way the resister would make contact
with anything else. Soldered the other end
to ground (pin #18) and started the re-
assembling and re-installation. I finished
in about an hour. Verified that the light
and wall switch was still working fine.
I finished yesterday at about 4:00 PM, and
as of this posting the light has NOT come
on!!  The modification works GREAT!
Thanks to everyone for helping me and
providing me with the valuable links!!

By the way....David L, I tried the soldering
iron trigger trick you told about, but
nothing happened.  In any case, I would
recommend you try the mod, you won't be
sorry.  Thanks again!
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Brian H

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Re: Wall Switch with a mind of its own
« Reply #22 on: July 30, 2005, 06:00:30 PM »

I have seen some errors in schematics from
third parties. Sometimes the unit is a
different revision. If memory serves me one
of the tranceivers has three different
revisions. Glad it worked so far and I think
it will be much better for you.
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david l

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Re: Wall Switch with a mind of its own
« Reply #23 on: August 01, 2005, 07:16:57 PM »

Icepick, that is great news.  Please post
again in a week or so and let us know if it
fixed it 100% or if you still get some
unwanted turn-ons.
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SteveRF

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Re: Wall Switch with a mind of its own
« Reply #24 on: August 01, 2005, 08:23:55 PM »

Sounds like a great idea !... Anyone got a
link  for an appliance module schematic and
what to do to make it "forget" its' last
state.  I have a pool pump that will not
always spin up after a power failure.  As you
can imagine, it HUMS until tripped off by
heat overload... If I am away, that is BAD
BAD... so I;d love to FIX an appliance module
to reset to OFF after a failure... Would
appreciate any tips and points to mods for
that purpose...
Many Thanks,
SteveRF
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Brian H

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Re: Wall Switch with a mind of its own
« Reply #25 on: August 01, 2005, 08:31:15 PM »

Appliance Modules have a mechanical relay
that ratchets between ON and OFF. Have not
seen any mods to force it to click off when
power is restored. I have seen modifications
for a lamp module to add an SSR type relay
that will drive a motor and it does stay off
when power is restored like all lamp modules
do. I have done a few myself. Down side is
care is needed. An All Lights ON signal will
also turn it ON. Appliance modules don't
respond to All Lights ON just All Units OFF.
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david l

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Re: Wall Switch with a mind of its own
« Reply #26 on: August 01, 2005, 10:08:14 PM »

SteveRF, the AM486 schematic can be found at http://www.idobartana.com/hakb/am486.jpg It is not necessarily 100% accurate but is close enough to see how it works.

It would be difficult to modify this as the relay is mechanically toggled and only has one coil.

Probably the easiest way to do what you want is to use an external relay that holds itself in with one of its own contacts, and a reset button you press to restore power after a failure. You could also use a momentary Universal module (UM506) to reset the relay via X10.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2009, 01:21:07 AM by -Bill- (of wgjohns.com) »
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SteveRF

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Re: Wall Switch with a mind of its own
« Reply #27 on: August 02, 2005, 08:40:45 AM »

David, Brian,
Thanks for the very good ideas and tech advice.
I like the relay idea.  I really do need to
do something before I burn up that $$$ pump
motor.

regards,
Steverf
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tim

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Re: Wall Switch with a mind of its own
« Reply #28 on: August 07, 2005, 09:28:37 PM »

Icepick,
Is it still really working?  I have the same
issue and I did the modification with no
improvement (although I think I used a 20K
resistor instead of the 10K (all I
had)....would the resistor size make a big diff ?
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icepick

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Re: Wall Switch with a mind of its own
« Reply #29 on: August 07, 2005, 11:11:02 PM »

Tim OC,
Still working great!!  No unwanted "ON's".
It's been over a week since I did the
modification, and I am 100% satified.  X10
needs to start manufacturing the Wall Switch
with this modification already done.

20K might be too much resistance.  Go to
Radio Shack and get the correct resister, a
5-pack cost .98 cents plus tax. Enough to do
your other Wall Switches.

Also , make sure that your putting the
resister to the correct pins.  The schematic
can be confusing.  If the resister is going
diagonally, (from the bottom pin on one side
of the IC, to the top of the other side)
then it should be correct.  It is not
correct if the resisiter goes across, it
must be diagonally. You can't confuse the
pins that are not is use (there is no solder
to the pins). The top one is pin#9.  Then
just go diagonally to the other side, to the
bottom.

Good Luck, and keep us updated as well!!
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