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Author Topic: WS469 power and current overrated?  (Read 290 times)

wardjk

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WS469 power and current overrated?
« on: November 15, 2023, 07:23:40 AM »

The WS469 is labelled for a maximum power of 1000W and a current of 10A, however, it has 18 AWG wires. How are the rated power and current justified with this wire? I realize the wires are short but what source indicates that this wire size is sufficient?
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Brian H

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Re: WS469 power and current overrated?
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2023, 06:51:38 AM »

I have seen 14A 1680 watts listed on a chart.
The NEC gauge chart says 14A on 90 degree C rated wire. With some commonly used insulation ID's.
I do agree a #16 wire would be better choice as other manufactures have used.
Don't have that module. Is the wire marked with any data like the gauge the wire is?

Using your favorite search engine?
Search for things like #18 wire amperage rating. You should find some sites with their ratings.
« Last Edit: November 16, 2023, 07:02:21 AM by Brian H »
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wardjk

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Re: WS469 power and current overrated?
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2023, 09:28:36 AM »

Part of the wire marking includes "18AWG 108C". I searched for recommended maximums because the rating seemed too high for that size wire. I didn't find any that even came close to the nameplate rating which is why I asked here. I was wondering if anyone knew of a source I hadn't found that supported the rating.
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Brian H

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Re: WS469 power and current overrated?
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2023, 05:33:56 PM »

Thank you for the added information.
I have seen the 14A 1680 watts but for now. This is a link that at least gives the NEC chart and it shows 14 amps with some insulation  types.

https://www.productinfo.schneider-electric.com/na-std-ref/viewer/5c0fee4b347bdf0001de4d55/5c0fee5b347bdf0001de4d6b/r/ConductorAmpacityBasedOnThe2017Nati-F20AB318
« Last Edit: November 16, 2023, 05:38:34 PM by Brian H »
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wardjk

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Re: WS469 power and current overrated?
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2023, 08:01:04 AM »

Another characteristic is that the strands appear to be aluminum. The conductor listed in the reference is for copper.
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Brian H

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Re: WS469 power and current overrated?
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2023, 05:49:16 PM »

I doubt it is aluminum wire as it needs special treatment to be safely connected.
I would think. More like tinned copper strands.

The only ones that can answer this 100%.  Is X10 themselves.
As we don't directly represent X10.
You could  email X10 support address.
They should have more details.

https://www.x10.com/pages/support
« Last Edit: November 19, 2023, 05:57:02 AM by Brian H »
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guyl

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Re: WS469 power and current overrated?
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2023, 01:21:05 PM »

Part of the wire marking includes "18AWG 108C". I searched for recommended maximums because the rating seemed too high for that size wire. I didn't find any that even came close to the nameplate rating which is why I asked here. I was wondering if anyone knew of a source I hadn't found that supported the rating.

The wire being rated to that temperature does allow it to conduct 10 amps, even more. The usual ratings we see for cables (14g, 15 amps, etc) are for sheathed cables in walls, where the temperature cannot usually exceed 60C. Device housings can be rated for higher ratings, as are things like heating appliances. If the X10 module is UL approved, then this has certainly been taken into consideration. You will also notice that building codes usually don't allow device power cords to be threaded inside walls for the same reason. The cord might have a smaller gauge than would be allowed for it's current carrying capacity (and temperature rise) inside a wall.
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