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Author Topic: Best filter for Fluorescent  (Read 22634 times)

hkactive

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Best filter for Fluorescent
« on: May 16, 2006, 05:26:55 PM »

Hi:

I have to do an install of a few lights. Most likely I will run into fluorescents.

But if I used the XPFM (The inline appliance switch), which filter would be the best to install between the flourescent's load line (black) and the XPFM's blue line.

I believe that would be the best place to put the filter. Please correct me, if I'm wrong. But that should filter out line noise between the ballast and the XPFM before it hits the XPFM while at the same time no filter whatsoever should be placed on the black line of the XPFM which is connected to the AC Power source and the signal source, in this case a CM15A.

But again. What filters are available? And what are their pro's and con's. Any help would be appreciated.

Hank
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Brian H

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Re: Best filter for Fluorescent
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2006, 06:22:00 PM »

Don't have any experience with wired in filters. You are correct on the filter should be on the load side of the module between the load and the modules output. If it was on the modules input side it would absorb or block the X10 signal to the module.
Note plug in modules also use the neutral return for some of its components. So you may have to wire the filter to the Blue of the module to black of the light and maybe a white from the filter to the junction of the powerline module neutral and lights neutral.
I have found that X10 specific filters are best [plug in only so far] others here may have used different types with equally well results.
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hkactive

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Re: Best filter for Fluorescent
« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2006, 08:38:59 PM »

Your advice seems pretty good. But I just want to make sure I have this right. It sounds good to me. But it doesn't hurt to have another opinion.

But in this particular example, there are 3 wires on the Leviton 6287 noise filter.
1. Black load
2. Black hot
3. White neutral

Again, correct me if I'm wrong. This can and does get confusing. Especially when you have 4 sets of joining wires to keep straight: The switch's, the filter's, the ballast's, and the power source.

But a basic principle should be to follow this sequence when hooking up a filter. (1) Wire the black power source to the Black(hot) line of the switch, (2) Wire the Blue load line of the switch to the Black hot line of the filter, (3) Wire the Blue/Black load line of the filter to the Black line of the ballast, and then (4) Wire all the White neutrals together: The switch's, the filter's, the ballasts' and the white from the source (breaker box, or whatever).

It took me awhile to think this through.  But that sequence should filter out problem causing noise from the ballast to the switch while leaving the path unfiltered from source to the switch. I can understand why people get flustered hooking up X10's.

I would think the same principle applies with a plug in switch. You would just have to use a voltmeter to see which wire is actually hot and actually cold.  I've seen some crazy things.

But that appears to be ok. But any input either way would be appreciated.

Hank



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orca

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Re: Best filter for Fluorescent
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2006, 07:30:39 PM »

I believe if you use the X10 Pro switch for flourescent fixtures you don't need a filter, at least that was our experience on a recent installation.

The switch is an XPS3-IW and it will also work in a 3way application with a XPSS slave.

Check it out with John at X10Pro Support at 800-832-4003.

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ArtClark

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Re: Best filter for Fluorescent
« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2006, 08:25:59 PM »

In seeing that no-one actually replyed to your question, The way you described the connections is fine.  I am assuming that the filter in question blocks and attenuates only on it's output.  If it went both ways, that would cause trouble when the light was on, but I'm sure they designed the filter for just that type of application.

Assuming some brains went into the design, that will be great.
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