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Author Topic: Ferrite EMI noise suppressors  (Read 5959 times)

madbrain

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Re: Ferrite EMI noise suppressors
« Reply #15 on: December 31, 2021, 04:28:59 PM »

Sorry I wasn't more clear - this IS a plug-in filter.  Since there are no more 15 amp filters being made or even coming up on ebay, this is a way to "roll your own" even if you're not handy.  The box I'm talking about wouldn't go in a wall or require an electrician or drywall, etc.  It would just be a box that would plug into an outlet.  The power strip would plug into the outlet coming from the box and the cord from the box plugs into the wall outlet.  This is something that requires no electrical know-how and very little effort. If you're interested in giving it a go I'll be happy to walk you through how to do it.  It'll take no more than 15 minutes to make and require nothing more than an inexpensive wire stripper, a drill to make the holes in the box and some twist-on wire nuts.

Thanks. In that case, yes, I would be interested. I do have all the tools you mention. I'll just need to buy wire nuts.
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brobin

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Re: Ferrite EMI noise suppressors
« Reply #16 on: December 31, 2021, 05:39:28 PM »

Here's a simple diagram of what you need to do and a list of parts from Amazon.

 1. Zulkit Waterproof Plastic Project Box ABS IP65 Electrical Junction box Enclosure Black 7.87 x 4.72 x 2.95 inch (200 x 120 x 75mm)
     https://tinyurl.com/yuduvchf

 2. 15 amp rated 3' extension cord. https://tinyurl.com/4jm8whjj

 3. X10 XPF  https://tinyurl.com/4ru4fnn6

 4. Wire Nuts.  https://tinyurl.com/334tvp3h

Cut the extension cord in half.
Drill a hole in each end of the box just big enough to insert the cut end of the cord.
Insert the ends of the cords into the holes and remove 6" of the outer jackets.
Strip about 3/4" from each of the wires and connect with wire nuts per the diagram. Use a red wire nut for the 3 white wires and yellow ones for the other connections. 
Use zip ties to secure the cords so they can't be pulled out.
Put the top on the case and you're DONE!



« Last Edit: December 31, 2021, 11:44:32 PM by brobin »
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madbrain

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Re: Ferrite EMI noise suppressors
« Reply #17 on: January 01, 2022, 10:35:24 PM »

Here's a simple diagram of what you need to do and a list of parts from Amazon.

 1. Zulkit Waterproof Plastic Project Box ABS IP65 Electrical Junction box Enclosure Black 7.87 x 4.72 x 2.95 inch (200 x 120 x 75mm)
     https://tinyurl.com/yuduvchf

 2. 15 amp rated 3' extension cord. https://tinyurl.com/4jm8whjj

 3. X10 XPF  https://tinyurl.com/4ru4fnn6

 4. Wire Nuts.  https://tinyurl.com/334tvp3h

Cut the extension cord in half.
Drill a hole in each end of the box just big enough to insert the cut end of the cord.
Insert the ends of the cords into the holes and remove 6" of the outer jackets.
Strip about 3/4" from each of the wires and connect with wire nuts per the diagram. Use a red wire nut for the 3 white wires and yellow ones for the other connections. 
Use zip ties to secure the cords so they can't be pulled out.
Put the top on the case and you're DONE!

Thanks. This is helpful. I'm going to think about it. I fear I'm not very skilled with a drill, and I'll end up with a device with loose cables. Also, you didn't mention how to fix the XPF within the box. Won't it be loose inside also ? What would you use ? Double-sided tape ? Glue ?
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brobin

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Re: Ferrite EMI noise suppressors
« Reply #18 on: January 02, 2022, 06:58:48 AM »

Double sided tape or Velcro strips would hold it in place or just leave it loose.

Here's a box that has the holes for the wires built in, provides strain relief so they won't pull out and the top just snaps on.  I use them outside for X10 modules.  It's a little bigger and a few dollars more but it eliminates the need to drill holes.  Available in Black or Green.

https://amzn.to/34fSpZ2



« Last Edit: January 02, 2022, 07:03:43 AM by brobin »
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bkenobi

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Re: Ferrite EMI noise suppressors
« Reply #19 on: January 02, 2022, 12:01:32 PM »

Hot glue works great for securing electronics.  For the extension cord, consider tying a knot in it that fits just inside the drilled hole.  You could probably also hot glue that knot to the box where it passes through to make it extra secure.  Depending on the type of plastic it can help to rough up the surface first with some sand paper so the glue has something to bite on.  There are more professional options that utilize a bushing of some kind, but I've seen a knot used in many consumer devices because it's cheap and works.

https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/77516/securing-electrical-cables-to-holes-in-enclosures

madbrain

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Re: Ferrite EMI noise suppressors
« Reply #20 on: January 02, 2022, 07:35:39 PM »

Double sided tape or Velcro strips would hold it in place or just leave it loose.

Here's a box that has the holes for the wires built in, provides strain relief so they won't pull out and the top just snaps on.  I use them outside for X10 modules.  It's a little bigger and a few dollars more but it eliminates the need to drill holes.  Available in Black or Green.

https://amzn.to/34fSpZ2

Thank you. That looks better, though it does bring the cost of the filter up. I'm still wondering if there is a ready made option out there. Even though the powerline ethernet frequencies don't overlap with X10, the powerline ethernet modems offered filtered outlets. Those outlets don't let any X10 signals through. So, I'm thinking those modems may be usable just as filters, even if I leave the ethernet cable unplugged. I happen to have a couple of extra modules, one TP-Link TL-PA8010 and one TL-8030. I'll try swapping my ACT120 with those in my home theater and see if they work as well. Without those ACT120, I can't control my lights there - X10 signals don't go through.
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brobin

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Re: Ferrite EMI noise suppressors
« Reply #21 on: January 02, 2022, 08:17:41 PM »

There are no commercially available 15 amp X10 filters being made by anybody anymore.   >*<
You now have all the info you need to make your own for about $60 or less if you need one.
Do let us know if the powerline modems do the job!
« Last Edit: January 04, 2022, 04:27:54 AM by brobin »
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JeffVolp

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Re: Ferrite EMI noise suppressors
« Reply #22 on: January 04, 2022, 11:20:30 AM »

There are no commercially available 15 amp X10 filters being made by anybody anymore.

If anybody wants to make more of the XTB-F10/F15, contact me for the Gerber files.  (The PCBs were made with 4 ounce copper due to the current.)

Jeff
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madbrain

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Re: Ferrite EMI noise suppressors
« Reply #23 on: January 04, 2022, 02:58:24 PM »

There are no commercially available 15 amp X10 filters being made by anybody anymore.   >*<
You now have all the info you need to make your own for about $60 or less if you need one.
Do let us know if the powerline modems do the job!

They do appear to do the job of filtering X10 signal in my home theater. And not much else, I might add. Since I added surge protector outlets, they don't connect to the powerline network anymore from those outlets. Which is OK since I have ethernet in that room. Main concern now is the power consumption. They are listed as consuming 6W typically, and 0.5W in power savings mode. I have to see if it'll go into power savings mode when not connected to the PL network. Guess it's time to pull a kill-a-watt.
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brobin

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Re: Ferrite EMI noise suppressors
« Reply #24 on: January 04, 2022, 03:08:58 PM »

6W is like a nightlight so you're not likely to notice a difference in your electric bill.
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bkenobi

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Re: Ferrite EMI noise suppressors
« Reply #25 on: January 04, 2022, 03:14:29 PM »

The average cost of electricity in the US is 10.42 cents/kWh so if you were to use a 6W device for 24 hours a day for the full year, that would be $5.48 per year.  I'm not one to waste resources for no reason, but if this is a device that helps in some way, I personally wouldn't stress too much about it.  Your X10 devices all use ~3W each.

JeffVolp

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Re: Ferrite EMI noise suppressors
« Reply #26 on: January 05, 2022, 12:04:52 PM »

The average cost of electricity in the US is 10.42 cents/kWh so if you were to use a 6W device for 24 hours a day for the full year, that would be $5.48 per year.

With everything "off" (breakers on, but nothing actually turned on), our base load was almost 100W.  That is consumed by X10 modules and many electronic devices and appliances in standby mode.  I went around pulling plugs on TVs and other devices that are rarely used to cut our base load by about a third.  But that saved less than a dime a day.

Jeff
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bkenobi

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Re: Ferrite EMI noise suppressors
« Reply #27 on: January 05, 2022, 01:24:09 PM »

I forget the name that was used when Energy Star was launched to describe all of the little wasted energy each device would use when not in use but turned on.  After 1992 though, the load of almost all devices when in standby went from significant to almost nothing.  In early computers, people would use a power strip right at the system to turn off monitors, printers, etc when you shut down the machine because the load when turned off was pretty significant.  I can't find numbers with my quick search, but an LCD uses almost nothing when turned on but in idle.  Very old CRT were apparently still energized to some degree as they still drew over 100W.  I used my Kill-A-Watt when I got it to test different appliances and found that my 42" Plasma TV draws ~400W whereas my 36" Trinitron drew ~600W.  I believe modern similar sized LCD would be more like 150-200W.  When turned off, none of these really drew anything that I can remember being significant (noise basically).  Love or hate the EPA, but Energy Star certainly made a difference!

madbrain

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Re: Ferrite EMI noise suppressors
« Reply #28 on: January 06, 2022, 01:50:24 AM »

6W is like a nightlight so you're not likely to notice a difference in your electric bill.

6W constantly on is 52.56 kWh annually. My marginal cost of electricity is close to 30 cents/kWh. So, that's about $15/year. Not a lot, but not nothing, especially if I'm going to have a bunch of filters throughout the house. Even small things add up.

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madbrain

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Re: Ferrite EMI noise suppressors
« Reply #29 on: January 06, 2022, 01:57:15 AM »

I forget the name that was used when Energy Star was launched to describe all of the little wasted energy each device would use when not in use but turned on.  After 1992 though, the load of almost all devices when in standby went from significant to almost nothing.  In early computers, people would use a power strip right at the system to turn off monitors, printers, etc when you shut down the machine because the load when turned off was pretty significant.  I can't find numbers with my quick search, but an LCD uses almost nothing when turned on but in idle.  Very old CRT were apparently still energized to some degree as they still drew over 100W.  I used my Kill-A-Watt when I got it to test different appliances and found that my 42" Plasma TV draws ~400W whereas my 36" Trinitron drew ~600W.  I believe modern similar sized LCD would be more like 150-200W.  When turned off, none of these really drew anything that I can remember being significant (noise basically).  Love or hate the EPA, but Energy Star certainly made a difference!

It's called vampire power. And yes, the EPA made a huge difference. My computers and monitors go to suspend mode when not in use. They still use very significant amounts of electricity when in use.
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